Musical miners tour

Discussion in 'South West' started by breakwake_, Jun 8, 2019.

  1. breakwake_

    breakwake_ UKChat Familiar

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2018
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    113
    Have to admire their ingenuity for ways to earn a living, we still have to do the same sort of thing to raise £100.


    Visit of the Workers’ Choir to Wells.

    THE MAYOR’S APPEAL FOR £100

    There have been few appeals in recent years which have aroused greater interest or evoked a deeper sympathy than that made behalf of the distressed miners of Cornwall. It is not one of the inevitable consequences of a severe trade slump affecting an industry scattered over the whole nation, but is a tragedy of a countryside in a part of Cornwall. The facts are so well-known now to the reading public that is needless- reiterate the cause of this unexampled tragedy a ruined calling.

    As a London correspondent recently wrote, “It is no ordinary story of slump and unemployment. Picture England with every industry ended, every factory silenced, every workshop closed, and you have large-scale illustration this slice of Cornwall. Tin mining was-everything. Every mine is shut down. There are no alternative activities; other industries —nothing.” There are 3,000 unemployed, mostly tin miners, in Camborne. Redruth, and Illogau, making total of nearly 12,000. with dependents. These men have, through no fault of their own have been out of work for many months, and there is yet little prospect of employment being found for them. Their cry for help is particularly genuine. The Cornish are stoical race, and for a prolonged period they faced the dire with courage that has won the admiration of every Britisher. For months the outside world knew not of their plight, but with actual starvation facing them their friends in the old county, although doing great- things themselves, felt compelled to ask for help from sympathizers throughout the land.

    Their case well set out by the following facts:—(l) These Cornish miners have never been strike. (2) They have never received any inflated “war wages.” Their thrifty savings are all gone. (4) They are self-respecting industrious British workmen; they shrink from begging; they desire no doles: but their wives and children are in danger of starvation and winter is coming on. (5) Including all sources income, unemployment doles, National Health. Old Age Pensions, etc., the average weekly income in hundreds cases amounts to less than 2s. 5d. per head.

    Recently in order to swell the funds a number of the most musical miners have been on tour in the West, and during the last week’ or so have been appealing to the large heart of Somerset. The singers themselves do not touch a penny of the sums contributed, the total being sent direct to the treasurer of the Distress Fund in Cornwall. The choir relies on the hospitality of friends to provide them with and lodgings, and so far no member has either gone shelterless or hungry.
     
    Altair likes this.
  2. Altair

    Altair UKChat Familiar

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2018
    Messages:
    2,051
    Likes Received:
    767
    Shocking sign of the times i'm afraid mate. It's happening all over the place not just in Wales..!

    Look at the Steel Industry? Which I am a part of......:(
     
    breakwake_ likes this.
  3. breakwake_

    breakwake_ UKChat Familiar

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2018
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    113
    I was looking for a date for my article, couldn't find one but its probably around 1900, nothing recent. We're still waiting for the jobs to be replaced though. They found sources of tin easier to get hold of, therefore cheaper. I only know of one member of my family that worked down a mine, we seem to be have been more into smithing. Which got shutdown in the '70's by the Competiton Authority, and the consequencial company sold off abroad.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2019

Share This Page