Do we expect too much from pets?

Discussion in 'Debates' started by LadyOnArooftop, Nov 8, 2019.

  1. LadyOnArooftop

    LadyOnArooftop UKChat Familiar

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    I was reading earlier about a partially sighted chap that had been abused in the street by animal rights activists simply because he had a guide dog. My initial reaction like any decent citizen was - you bastards. Then I got to thinking about the dog and the life it must lead. Guide dogs always look so sad to me, they never get to play with other dogs. Is the raison d'etre of a pet to serve/protect/love us etc, should they have to earn their keep or do we expect too much from them?

    I only ask because for a few days now our cat has been dead to me. I was doing the dishes looking out of the window daydreaming when out of the corner of my eye, you know when you see something? a field mouse had wandered in bold as brass through the open patio door. After getting over the shock and revulsion I managed with great trepidation to position the cat who was lol'ing around, as per, between me and the mouse. It showed no interest in the mouse whatsoever, if anything it showed fear. Only my scream made it return from whence it came, followed by the shutting of the patio door never to be left open again.

    Now this cat 'Asmo', the other half named him (short for Asmodeus) I'm told it means the destroyer the exterminator, never has a cat been so ill named! well we got him from a rescue centre 2 years ago, one whole side of his face is caved in so he's no doubt been mistreated in the past. He won't even venture out into the garden. Since we've had him I've done nothing but shower him with love and affection but he didn't do the one thing I expect of him - catch mice. No doubt I shall resurrect him from the dead soon but things can never be the same. :(
     
  2. megs233

    megs233 UKChat Familiar

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    Right i think the article you was reading i read too . some people are that way inclined .
    yes they working dogs but you missing point read up on guide dogs before u write anything , when at home they get free time , they do get play , they are taught from a young age they are working dogs . My grandson has a working dog, he senses when grandson is about to have seizure. He 'works' mostly when child is asleep . He get fee time when grandsons at school and he comes to play and run round park when we go .But he goes back on duty when grandson returns home.
    I speak to a young blind man who live round corner to me whom we meet when out walking he has two dogs . one that works in house and one that works when he goes out , again when one not working they resting and playing. and he told me that sometimes they go on 'hoilday' to kennels when he goes away with parents so both dogs get a break .
    No i dont think we expect to much form our dogs , some are working dogs and are PETS.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2019
  3. breakwake_

    breakwake_ UKChat Familiar

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    I had a pet collie whose parents were both working sheepdogs, that collie would never stop going after his ball and playing games, too much so in the end. A dog would never do something it didn't want to do, its in the genes and the way they're brought up, some species of dog at better at some things than others. Some dogs never make it to the job they were trained to do because they're of the wrong temperament. Its not like a dog is just plucked up to do something and forced to do it. Another dog of mine was nearly drowned by the farmer as a pup because of a flopply ear it had, which would somehow make it a bad sheepdog. Its the dogs that do a job that are the lucky ones sometimes, not just because they're alive but they also have to be kept well to do their job well.
     
  4. supercookie123

    supercookie123 UKChat Familiar

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    Trust you to lower the tone with ya 'dongs', Megs! x
     
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  5. megs233

    megs233 UKChat Familiar

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    opps i did read it before i posted i go amend
    so sorry miss teacher xx
     
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  6. supercookie123

    supercookie123 UKChat Familiar

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    All true. My dad had a litter of sheepdogs back in the late eighties. Even then, he was offered £2k for their mother, who was a phenomenal sheepdog and would do anything asked of her and yet was really affectionate and, to my Dad's annoyance, a bit spoiled by us. People were flocking to buy the pups and Dad kept one. In a few months, I was delighted when Pops came in with the Chosen One, muttering what a 'useless bastard' he was and how I could, 'bloody have him'. Yay! You really cannot force a dog to do your bidding. His mother (not my Dad's - she was just my Nan) loved what she did and lived to please; Sam (or Dead Dogg Sam as we now call him) was a huge, lumbering, quite dim old friend. He'd have died for me, though, if only by accident.
     
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  7. supercookie123

    supercookie123 UKChat Familiar

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    I like it as it is! x
     
  8. LadyOnArooftop

    LadyOnArooftop UKChat Familiar

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    Forgive my ignorance, I admit to being uneducated it's the bane of my life. I look to you for guidance.
     

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